EU Court of Justice 'Schrems II' ruling seen as potential game-changer for FATCA challenges in Europe

Lawyers and campaigners against the American tax evasion law known as FATCA say that last week's European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling, which struck down the main mechanism used by the EU to protect the personal data of EU citizens when it's transferred to the U.S., represents a potential "game changer" – and could force Europe's courts to revisit the way FATCA compels Europe's banks and financial institutions to pass information on their U.S. citizen and Green Card-holding account-holders to the U.S. 

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The FATCA/AEOI Papers: Mishcon publishes research trove, unearthed as part of crowd-funded UK FATCA case

Correspondence and other documents having to do with the way the U.S. tax evasion-prevention law known as FATCA was agreed upon, and is now enforced by EU governments – along with similar materials having to do with the OECD’s more recent automatic exchange of information (AEOI) regime known as the Common Reporting Standard – have been published by a campaigning lawyer with London’s Mishcon de Reya law firm.

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Opinion

Bright!Tax comment: The candidates' tax plans, and their likely implications for expats

Bright!Tax comment: The candidates' tax plans, and their likely implications for expats

Nov. 3, the date of the 2020 U.S. presidential election, is two weeks and one day away. Many expats will have voted by now, but for those who haven't –...

Oct-19-2020