A renounced ‘accidental’ replies to UK gov’t’s Stride: ‘It’s not that we’re not British, we are – but we're also not really American'

Last week, it was revealed that British Labour MP Preet Kaur Gill had received her second formulaic and non-committal response in two months to specific questions she had asked the UK government on behalf of one of her “accidental American” constituents.

As reported, the response was seen by many in the American expat community in Britain and elsewhere as an indication that the UK was strongly disinclined to rally to the support of the country’s “accidental American” citizens, presumably out of concern for what it might do to U.S./UK relations at a time when the UK might need all the friends it can get, as it faces a possible no-deal Brexit.

Here, Tom Carpenter, a former “accidental American” who lives in the UK, after having come here as a 18-month-old, describes how he finally lost hope last year that the U.S. would ever make it any easier for its expats. With a mixture of fury and resignation, he stumped up the requisite US$2,350 and renounced his U.S. citizenship – an act some have taken to calling “citizide,” because of the reluctance with which it is typically undertaken…

Criticism for second understated response to U.K. lawmaker’s championing of 'accidentals' plight

For the second time in two months, it has been revealed, a Labour Party member of Britain's Parliament received a formulaic and non-committal response to specific questions she had asked the U.K. government on behalf of some of its citizens – who also happen to be regarded by the U.S. as Americans, and therefore face considerable hardship as a result of the way the U.S. taxes such "accidental Americans."

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Gavel-spotting is new sport for expat Americans in UK, Commonwealth courts

Last month's trial over the constitutionality of the Canadian government's enforcement of America’s FATCA legislation was, of course, hugely important for American expats around the world, all of whom are waiting, or perhaps should be, to hear how the court ultimately rules. For some, though, it was also a chance to study the gavel habits of a country other than the United States, and then sit back and wait for the gavel imagery that almost inevitably follows such events.

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Appeal predicted, as Canada FATCA trial ends, 'no matter who wins'

 As last week's trial over the constitutionality of the Canadian government's enforcement of America’s FATCA legislation ended on Friday, the Alliance for the Defence of Canadian Sovereignty (ADCS), which brought the case on behalf of two individual plaintiffs, said an appeal would ultimately follow, "no matter who wins."

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Opinion

A renounced ‘accidental’ replies to UK gov’t’s Stride: ‘It’s not that we’re not British, we are – but we're also not really American'

A renounced ‘accidental’ replies to UK gov’t’s Stride: ‘It’s not that we’re not British, we are – but we're also not really American'

Last week, it was revealed that British Labour MP Preet Kaur Gill had received her second formulaic and non-committal response in two months to specific questions she had asked the...

Feb-19-2019