updated 11:06 PM CET, Dec 2, 2022

Opinion

Ross McGill: ‘FATCA isn’t the problem: CBT is’ 

In the early years of this century, a number of major media exposés reported how Homeland Americans, as well as rich people from other developed and developing countries, were making use of secret overseas bank accounts in order to avoid their tax obligations back home. 
 
Switzerland, where bank secrecy was enshrined in law, was an unsurprising favorite of many such wealthy individuals, but other jurisdictions were also named...

John Richardson: 'The CRS ≠ FATCA'

When the U.S. Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act finally came into force around the world in 2014 –  four years after it was signed into law by President Obama – the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development was preparing its own account information reporting regulations package.

The Common Reporting Standard, as it was to be known as, differed from FATCA in that it was intended to be global, and fully reciprocal – meaning that those countries participating in the collecting and forwarding of information about other countries' resident taxpayer's financial accounts would expect to receive the same data about their taxpayers resident in that country... 

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